Current Exhibitions

Tonalism: Pathway from the Hudson River School to Modern Art

Curated by Karen Quinn

August 28 – December 8, 2019
Morgan Anderson and Howard Greenberg Family Galleries

Birge Harrison, St. Lawrence River Sunset, n.d., oil on canvas, New York State Museum, Historic Woodstock Art Colony: Arthur A. Anderson Collection

 

Tonalism has long been considered a conservative late 19th-century approach to painting, often discussed as the antithesis to Impressionism.  Recent publications have begun to reconsider Tonalism as innovative in its approach to representation both conceptually and as realized, an approach that helped to lay the groundwork for modernism and contemporary art.  This exhibition will reposition Tonalism in this new context.

Many of the works included in this exhibition will be loaned by private collectors, thereby offering viewers the chance to see works that are not in the public domain.

Organized by the Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art and the New York State Museum.


Paper Media: Boetti, Calzolari, Kounellis

Curated by Francesco Guzzetti

August 28 – December 8, 2019
Sara Bedrick Gallery

Jannis Kounellis, Segnali [Signals], 1960, tempera, glue on cartridge paper, courtesy the Olnick Spanu Collection, New York

 

On loan from Magazzino Italian Art, this exhibition will bring together the work of three artist who are part of the Olnick Spanu Collection: Alighiero Boetti (1940–1994), Pier-Paolo Calzolari (b.1943) and Jannis Kounellis (1936–2017) and will feature mixed media works on paper.

Magazzino Italian Art is a museum located in Cold Spring, New York, devoted to Postwar and Contemporary Italian art. Magazzino, meaning "warehouse" in Italian, was co-founded by Nancy Olnick and Giorgio Spanu.

Organized by the Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art and Magazzino Italian Art Foundation.


Madness in Vegetables: Hudson Valley Artists 2019

Curated by Alyson Baker and Candice Madey

June 15 – November 10, 2019
Alice and Horace Chandler and North Galleries

Scott Serrano, Professor Hitchcock's Tentacled Jelly Mellon, 2018, ink and watercolor on watercolor paper, wood, courtesy the artist

 

The 2019 edition of the Hudson Valley Artists series is titled Madness in Vegetables: Hudson Valley Artists 2019. It calls for works that address the political and civic implications of choosing a rural life; the enticing beauty and repellant brutality of nature; our ever-changing climate; the wild character of plants, gardens, forests, and fauna; the relevance, power and forms of anthropomorphic mythmaking; and poetic and fantastical interpretations of the woodlands.

Exhibiting artists:

Bob Barry | Julie Evans | Mara Held | Virginia Lavado | Elisa Lendvay | Scott Serrano | Claudia McNulty | David Nyzio | Phyllis Gay Palmer | Libby Paloma | Lauren Piperno | Jackie Shatz | Linda Stillman | Jean-Marc Superville Sovak | Christina Tenaglia | scrap wrenn | Roberta Ziemba


The Ukiyo-e Movement: Gems from the Dorsky Museum Collection of Japanese Woodblock Prints

Curated by Elizabeth Brotherton, Associate Professor, Art History, SUNY New Paltz

August 28 – December 8, 2019
Seminar Room

Kitagawa Utamaro, Untitled (from the series “Twelve Types of Women’s Handicraft”), 1798–1799, woodcut, Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, gift of Dr. Hugo Munsterberg, 1966.009

 

Ukiyo-e, translated as "pictures of the floating world," while not strictly a movement in the sense of being the product of closely aligned artists setting out to make an artistic statement, do comprise a constantly evolving body of works that could only have been produced in the unique context of Edo Japan (1600–1868) and its mingling of newly confident artisans, leisured samurai, and a growing urban audience.  

This exhibition, drawn from the Dorsky Museum collection and held in conjunction with the 2019 meeting of the New York Conference on Asian Studies, includes a range of ukiyo-e woodblock prints that were mostly produced during the later stages of this movement, when the shifting function of the prints, combined with greater censorial control of their content by the government, brought about an increasing variety in type and subject matter. Between roughly 1750 and 1850, ukiyo-e prints moved well beyond the representation of their core subject matter of courtesans and actors (through which they helped create a celebrity culture with similarities to our own), and broadened out to include such themes as literary illustration and commentary, traditional folk tales that often had political subtexts, landscapes, and eccentric self-expression.


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