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Hudson Valley Future Summit

Locals & Weekenders

ODD COUPLES IN THE HUDSON VALLEY

Locals & Weekenders

Bedroom communities, commuter towns, quaint villages, country roads. We want access and beauty, convenience and preservation. What is the ideal mix of locals and weekenders? How can we keep our towns alive but also be the country outlet for the second largest city on Earth?

Samuel Cristler, Conductor

What made you decide to work and/or live in the Hudson Valley?

I had never heard of New Paltz, but 18 years ago I come up from the city for an afternoon break and immediately fell in love.  Five weeks later I bought a maison secondaire, and I've lived happily ever after.

What would you like the audience and your fellow attendees to know about you?

I suppose this is the place I'm supposed to say I'm gay, but that has been something I preferred to keep unspoken until a few years ago.  I used to work virtually all the time, learned four languages and traveled extensively; but now I am taking time off to do all the things that I never had time for as a musician.  I am most proud of my trajectory in life, from poverty on a farm in the midwest to the podium of the Metropolitan Opera.  I use to keep the poverty a secret too, because it wouldn't serve when I was fundraising for an orchestra I conducted, but now I have achieved my goals and feel relaxed, open and ready for a mature project.

 

Liza Donnelly, Cartoonist and Writer, The New Yorker

What made you decide to work and/or live in the Hudson Valley?

I love the Hudson Valley because it is beautiful and is near New York City. I love the rolling hills and the proximity of the Hudson River to our home.  The pace of life is slower than New York, and I enjoy the community of creative people and farmers, New York city transplants and local residents. I also love the small towns around us, that in part seem untouched by time.

What would you like the audience and your fellow attendees to know about you?

I have been a cartoonist since I was young, and began at The New Yorker  in 1982. In the last ten years, I  have become a writer as well and am the author/editor of 16 books. I also do a lot of public speaking, internationally and in the US. I am very connected to the international cartoon community, and love it. My recent passion is live drawing on my iPad and sharing on social media. I am invited to attend events; I covered the DNC and the debates for CBS News, who hired me this fall as their "resident cartoonist."  I live in Milan with my husband, New Yorker cartoonist Michael Maslin. We have two grown daughters, who also live in the Hudson Valley.

 

Laurent Hainaut, force MAJEURE Design

What made you decide to work and/or live in the Hudson Valley?

Our decision to move a spend most of our weekend in the catskill was the best answer to our need for nature, a more relaxed lifestyle, and the art, the craft and the culture we discovered in the area.

What would you like the audience and your fellow attendees to know about you?

French born, I am an Industrial Designer by training.
I am the founder of force MAJEURE, a 40 people Branding and Design Agency based in Brooklyn and in Paris.
While working in Paris with brands such as LancĂ´me, L'Oreal, Roger et Gallet and Waterman, I quickly embraced global branding and graphic design.
I moved with my family to the U.S. in 1998 to establish forceMAJEURE Design in New York, and we since have worked with many notable brands such as AT Cross, Dove, Evian, Johnnie Walker, and Ciroc. We became American citizens in 2011, and we enjoy our life in Brooklyn and Woodstock.
 

 

Elizabeth Ryan, Owner, Breezy Hill Orchards

 

 What made you decide to work and/or live in the Hudson Valley?

I came to the Hudson Valley as a young farmer, attracted by the landscape, rich fruit growing traditions and the intersection of food/culture/agriculture and music. I was inspired by the great Pete and Toshi Seeger at a young age, the Roosevelt legacy the art of the Hudson River School, and an incredible sense that all things were possible. We could clean up the river, embrace our friends and enemies, built a culture of support and diversity. I wanted to grow beautiful healthy food and be a shining example of what we could do if we put our hearts and minds to it. I still feel that way. But as an older person, I know that despite many accomplishments, change comes slowly and often presents new challenges. I want to avoid the potential negative consequences of being victims of our our successes and stay the course for a broad strong local economy of shared prosperity for all. I am interested in solutions and successes.

 

What would you like the audience and your fellow attendees to know about you?

I am a longtime farmer and activist with 4 decades of experience. I have a strong commitment to shared prosperity, especially in the food and agriculture sector. I manage over 250 acres of working farmland as sustainable as possible. The good people who co-farm with me are as important as the land and ecosystem. one of our core challenges remains supporting everyone in the food chain with a true quality of life. We have a long way to go still, Climate change presents great challenges for food and farming. and the low direct cost of food creates pressure on the system at every level, starting in the field. I want to create models that support the notion of shared prosperity.

 

Eve Waltermaurer, Director of Research & Evaluation/Associate Professor of Sociology, SUNY New Paltz

What made you decide to work and/or live in the Hudson Valley?

I was hired by SUNY New Paltz.

What would you like the audience and your fellow attendees to know about you?

Although I grew up in Brooklyn, my parents were visiting Saugerties for July Fourth weekend in 1968, resulting in my being born in Kingston's Benedictine Hospital. My grandparents ran a resort in Saugerties allowing me to visit this area throughout my life. It is during this time I grew to love the Hudson Valley. I am very happy to live in Ulster County now with my two children and be a part of SUNY New Paltz as the director of research and evaluation for the Benjamin Center, working to assist non-profits, healthcare and government in this region.