Spuyten Duyvil Undergrad Mathematics Conference

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Funding for SDUMC is provided by the School of Science and Engineering at SUNY New Paltz and the SUNY New Paltz Office of the Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs.
Spuyten Duyvil graphic by Kristen Bussanich Sangregorio, Manhattan College '06.
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SUNY New Paltz is pleased to host the 11th annual Spuyten Duyvil Undergraduate Mathematics Conference. This one-day conference will feature presentations by undergraduate students and faculty in mathematics and related disciplines. Registration is now closed!

The primary goal of the conference is to offer undergraduates the opportunity to attend and actively participate in a professional mathematics meeting and to discuss mathematics with their peers. Attendees may apply to give a 15-minute talk or submit a poster.

There is no registration fee. Lunch will be provided and a continental breakfast will be available during morning registration.

As part of the conference, the AMS/AWM/SIAM Math Clubs at SUNY New Paltz will organize an integration bee. Undergraduate students are invited to compete. A prize will be awarded to the winner!

Funding for SDUMC is provided by the School of Science and Engineering at SUNY New Paltz and the SUNY New Paltz Office of the Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs.

KEYNOTE ADDRESS:

Dr. Christelle Vincent (University of Vermont)

Title: How secure is encryption? A look at the number theory behind cryptography

Abstract: These days, it is common knowledge that internet traffic should be securely encrypted. However, few people know exactly what this means in practice! In this talk, we will present the broad strokes of how modern cryptographic methods are used to encrypt internet traffic. We will emphasize the step that uses public-key cryptography and present some of the number theory behind a few popular public-key cryptographic schemes. Finally, we will end with a short discussion of some vulnerabilities of these schemes.

Biography: Professor Vincent earned her Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, under the supervision of Professor Ken Ono. She recently finished a postdoctoral lectureship at Stanford University and a semester at Brown University’s Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics. She is now an Assistant Professor at the University of Vermont, where she studies algebraic curves and modular forms. She was born in Montréal, Canada, and speaks French and English fluently. In her free time, she likes to travel, do yoga, and read way too much internet news.