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Park Point

College Foundation, Wilmorite no longer pursuing housing project

A joint statement from SUNY New Paltz Foundation Executive Director Erica Marks and SUNY New Paltz President Donald P. Christian.

The Park Point apartment housing project for students, faculty, and staff proposed by the SUNY New Paltz Foundation and Rochester developer Wilmorite did not receive town approval after review, planning and consultation dating to 2009. Given the continued delays and no clear path to completion, the SUNY New Paltz Foundation has decided to no longer pursue this project with Wilmorite.

This project, proposed for land already tax-exempt near the College, would have supported SUNY New Paltz and also benefited the community with additional sewage treatment capacity and payment-in-lieu of taxes for 25 years, followed by full taxes on the student housing portion of the development, and full taxes from day one on the faculty housing portion. This project was designed to meet known College housing needs, was targeted for the commercial corridor identified by the town and, in year one, would have resulted in $500,000 in tax payments to the town, county and school district.  Housing built on state land yields no tax revenue for the town.

“Student housing remains a critical need if the College is to sustain its academic mission and continue its positive contributions to the region,” said SUNY New Paltz President Donald Christian. “The College appreciates the town board and planning board’s repeated acknowledgment during the review process of the College’s need for housing. SUNY New Paltz now must evaluate other options to address its still pressing housing needs.”

Even with the opening of Ridgeview Hall in August 2015, SUNY New Paltz, a highly-rated public university and economic anchor for New Paltz and the Hudson Valley, has fewer residential hall beds per capita than other SUNY campuses, and no apartments.