Past Exhibitions


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Bradley Walker Tomlin, Tension by Moonlight, 1948, oil on canvas, Everson Museum of Art, gift of Mrs. Kathleen Tomlin, Mrs. Earle Dockstader, and Jean Barron, PC 78.36

Bradley Walker Tomlin: A Retrospective

Curated by Daniel Belasco

August 31 — December 11, 2016
Morgan Anderson Gallery

The Dorsky Museum, in partnership with the Everson Museum of Art, is organizing the first retrospective and catalogue of American painter Bradley Walker Tomlin (1899–1953) since 1975. “The gentleman Abstract Expressionist,” in the words of poet John Ashbury, Tomlin was known for his elegance in both painting style and personal comportment. Bradley Walker Tomlin: A Retrospective will include over 40 paintings, works on paper, and printed materials, charting Tomlin’s development from art nouveau illustrations of the 1920s to large-scale Abstract Expressionist paintings of the 1950s. The exhibition explores his formative years in Syracuse, early patronage by Condé Nast, and the important role played by the Woodstock art colony. Tomlin is best known as a key figure in the New York School and had close friendships with Adolph Gottlieb, Philip Guston, and Robert Motherwell. Unlike most of his peers, Tomlin focused on the impersonal possibilities of art. His carefully orchestrated paintings resonate with our time’s renewed interest in abstraction and design.

 

Myra Mimlitsch-Gray, Clove Oval, 2010, copper, brass, courtesy the artist

In/Animate: Recent Work by Myra Mimlitsch-Gray

Curated by Akiko Busch

August 31 – December 11, 2016
Sara Bedrick Gallery

In/Animate surveys the past decade of work by Myra Mimlitsch-Gray, internationally renowned metalsmith and head of the Metal Program at SUNY New Paltz. Curated by author Akiko Busch, the exhibition explores a variety of artistic processes using iron, copper, brass, silver, and enameled steel. Mimlitsch-Gray’s domestic artifacts suggest a coalescence of body and thing, conveying the mutability of the animate and inanimate and reflecting the intimacy between people and the objects they use. A spoon could be a lip, or a dangling twist of fabric, a vein. Over 40 meticulously crafted works contribute to the contemporary conversation about how household objects express ideas about presentation, utility, and class.

 

BFA/MFA Thesis Exhibitions Fall 2016

Curated by Curated by art faculty and students

December 2–6, 2016, December 9–13, 2016
Alice & Horace Chandler Gallery and North Gallery

Students graduating with Bacherlor of Fine Arts or Master of Fine Arts degrees exhibit work created as part of their thesis projects. Exhibitions are designed and installed by the students, under the supervision of the Curator of Exhibitions and the museum Preparator. 

Stephen Farrell - Painting & Drawing / PJ Flannigan - Printmaking / Emily Glascott - Printmaking / David Khorassani - Photography / Tyler Lentini - Painting & Drawing / Natalie Nicholson - Metal / John Owens - Printmaking / Ryan Pietraszek - Photography / Malissa Williams - Painting & Drawing

Danni Bellando - Painting & Drawing / Jung Yun Choi - Sculpture / Matthew Grandy - Photography / Sarah Heitmeyer - Ceramics / Breana Hendricks - Ceramics / Jiyoung Lee - Metal / Rebecca Spodick - Painting & Drawing / Alexia Velez - Sculpture

 

Carmen de Lavallade

Carl Van Vechten, Carmen de Lavallade, c. 1955, gelatin silver print, gift of Howard Greenberg 

On the Street and in the Studio: Photographs Donated by Howard Greenberg (Part II)

Curated by Daniel Belasco

August 31 – December 11, 2016
Howard Greenberg Family Gallery

Dealer and specialist Howard Greenberg has significantly impacted the study and collecting of photography over the past four decades, expanding the field to include once underappreciated artists and movements around the globe. Among his legacies are 1,148 photographs donated to The Dorsky Museum, forming a rich study collection of works by 101 artists. On the Street and in the Studio is a two-part exhibition that evaluates more than 70 highlights and novelties. In Spring 2016, Part I focused on street photography, defined as spontaneous photographs taken in urban public spaces. In Fall 2016, Part II focuses on portraiture and the personal relationship between photographer and subject.

 

Kitagawa Utamaro, Two women, c. 1800, Woodcut, 1989.010.002, gift of Hugo Munsterberg

All Excess Stripped Away: Donations to The Dorsky Museum by Hugo Munsterberg

Curated by Elizabeth Brotherton

August 31 – December 11, 2016
Seminar Room

The items gathered in this exhibition were all donated to the College Art Gallery (later The Dorsky Museum) by Professor Emeritus Hugo Munsterberg (d. 1995), who began teaching in the Division of Art Education at SUNY New Paltz in 1958. The widely differing cultures and periods that are represented in this group of art works indicate Munsterberg’s broad approach, regarding art as a primordial activity common to all humanity, and as a carrier of meaning that transcended its immediate background or cultural boundary, and also show his support for practicing artists working in the Art Department of SUNY New Paltz or in the larger Hudson Valley area.

 

Ruby Palmer, Yellows, 2016, Painted wood on support, courtesy the artist

CAMPSITE: Hudson Valley Artists 2016

Curated by Corinna Ripps Schaming

June 18 — November 13, 2016
Alice and Horace Chandler Gallery and North Gallery

CAMPSITE: Hudson Valley Artists 2016 draws inspiration from the traditions, rituals, and aesthetics associated with the region’s rich history of summer camps. Moving freely across artistic disciplines and mediums, including performance, textiles, painting, drawing, installation, video, and photography, CAMPSITE promises to transform the museum space into a locus of visual pleasures and unexpected activities where playful exploration leads to more serious engagement with the larger world. Participating artists are: Jessica Baker, Black Lake (Susan Jennings and Slink Moss), Elizabeth Ennis, Tara Fracalossi, Chris Freeman, Laura Kaufman, Thomas Lail, Meg Lipke, Michael Covello Odalla, Ruby Palmer, Jeff Starr, Amy Talluto, Katharine Umsted, and Chris Victor.

 

Kieren Kinsella, Stools, 2014-15, Photo: Craig Hoeksema

Made for You: New Directions in Contemporary Design

Curated by Jennifer Scanlan

February 6 – July 10, 2016
Morgan Anderson and Corridor Galleries

In the 21st century, design has become personal. Bombarded by an endless array of mass-produced objects in big box stores and on the Internet, people are increasingly attracted to the unique and custom-made. Drawing on designers and makers in the Hudson Valley and environs, this exhibition considers the ways in which the contemporary design object is customized for the individual, from the one-of-a-kind objects made by craft techniques to the latest technological advances of 3D printing. The exhibition will include approximately 25 designers/makers and demonstrate a range of approaches to design.

 

Adriaen Van Ostade, Peasant Family/The Family, 1647, etching, gift in memory of Wendall J. Van Lare, class of 1967, from his family

Dutch Prints of Daily Life: A Recent Gift from the Collection of Wendell J. and Karen Van Lare

Curated by The Dorsky Museum

February 6 — July 10, 2016
Seminar Room

The prints on display in this room are a recent gift made to The Dorsky Museum by the family of Wendell J. and Karen Van Lare. Donated largely for purposes of student research and education, they are displayed in their new home for the first time. Wendell Van Lare, a former New Paltz Foundation Board Director, graduated from SUNY New Paltz in 1967 with an education degree. Inspired by their Dutch heritage, the Van Lares assembled a collection of about forty engravings and etchings of daily life and landscapes by the major artists of Dutch 17th-century printmaking. The prints’ depictions of life in Holland also hold special meaning for the village of New Paltz, as it was originally part of New Netherland, a colonial province of the Seven United Netherlands located on the east coast of North America.

 

Rudie Berkhout, The New Territories (detail), 1984, Transmission hologram mounted on glass, two parts, 12 x 16 in. each, Estate of Rudie Berkhout

The Floating World: Holograms by Rudie Berkhout

Curated by Daniel Belasco

February 6 – July 10, 2016
Sara Bedrick Gallery

Holography first became available to artists in the late 1960s. Within its first decade, Rudie Berkhout (1946–2008) emerged as one of the new medium's leading innovators. The Floating World will feature the Dutch-born, New York-based artist's captivating "Transmission" works of the 1970s and 80s. Rear-mounted lights illuminate glass plates to project holographic images into space. The viewer steps into and away from the plates to interact with the ever-changing geometrical forms and organic textures, which reference electronic music, Asian cultures, and local landscape. The exhibition will be accompanied by the first catalogue dedicated to Berkhout, published in partnership with the Center for the Holographic Arts, New York.

 

Eugène Atget, Prison (Demoli), c. 1900, Albumen print on paper, 7 x 8 5/8 in., Gift of Howard Greenberg

On the Street and in the Studio: Photographs Donated by Howard Greenberg (Part I)

Curated by Daniel Belasco

February 6 – July 10, 2016 (Part I) August 31 – December 11, 2016 (Part II)
Howard Greenberg Family Gallery

Dealer and specialist Howard Greenberg has significantly impacted the study and collecting of photography over the past four decades, expanding the field to include once underappreciated artists and movements around the globe. Among his legacies are 1,145 photographs donated to The Dorsky Museum, forming a rich study collection of works by 101 artists, from singular prints by European masters Eugène Atget and Julia Margaret Cameron to in-depth holdings of over 100 prints by New Yorkers Morris Huberland and Carl Van Vechten. On the Street and in the Studio is a two-part exhibition that evaluates more than 70 highlights and novelties. Part I will focus on street photography, defined as spontaneous photographs taken in urban public spaces. Part II focuses on portraiture and the personal relationship between photographer and subject. Many of these prints have never been exhibited. The two exhibitions affirm the history of photography as a continual work-in-progress.

 

Andrew Lyght, Air Rights NYLyght 6136, 2009–10, courtesy the artist

Andrew Lyght: Full Circle

Curated by Tumelo Mosaka

January 20 — April 10, 2016
Alice and Horace Chandler and North Galleries

Curated by Tumelo Mosaka, Andrew Lyght: Full Circle is the artist's first museum exhibition since he moved to Kingston, NY in 2006. Best known for his flexible and volumetric forms, vibrant paintings, and abstract linear drawings, Lyght creates a wide range of works that analyze the structural properties of painting and reanimate pictorial space as an open system. Over the many years he has developed an art form that explores the built environment as a dynamic pictorial subject, introducing new ways of seeing the world around us.

 

Jervis McEntee, View Facing the Catskills, 1863, oil on canvas, private collection

Jervis McEntee: Painter-Poet of the Hudson River School

Curated by Lee A. Vedder

August 26 — December 13, 2015
Morgan Anderson and Howard Greenberg Family Galleries

Jervis McEntee: Painter-Poet of the Hudson River School is the first museum retrospective of McEntee's 40-year career and seeks to redefine his place in the history of 19th-century American landscape painting. While most of the Hudson River School painters came from far beyond its riverbanks, Jervis McEntee (1828–1891) was born and died in Rondout (later Kingston), on the Hudson's west bank. Moreover, he devoted the major part of his energies to painting the nuances of the local Hudson Valley and nearby Catskills, following his own unique artistic compass. The exhibition and accompanying catalogue present McEntee's art in the context of his aesthetic and poetic temperament, and the inspiration and encouragement he derived from his close circle of artist friends, which included architect Calvert Vaux and fellow landscape painters Frederic Church, Sanford Gifford, John F. Weir, and Worthington Whittredge. The exhibition contained approximately 80 paintings and works on paper from private and public collections.

 

Thomas Benjamin Pope, Untitled (Rosary Heights Looking South to the City of Newburgh), n.d., oil on canvas, collection of Richard and Marguerite Lease

Thomas Benjamin Pope: Landscapes of Newburgh and Beyond

Curated by Chloe DeRocker

August 26 — December 13, 2015
Seminar Room

Thomas Benjamin Pope: Landscapes of Newburgh and Beyond showcases eight paintings by Hudson River School artist Thomas Benjamin Pope from the collection of Richard and Marguerite Lease. Scenes from the Hudson River Valley, the White Mountains of New Hampshire, and possibly Europe tell the story of Pope's life and travels. Pope's landscapes display his distinct approach to representing the atmosphere, particularly the sky. To this day Pope remains a notable figure in the history and culture of his beloved Newburgh.

 

Frank Paulin, Automat, Times Square, 1956 [printed 2009], pigment print, gift of the artist, 2009.035.004

Reading Objects 2015

Curated by Wayne Lempka

August 26 — December 13, 2015
Sara Bedrick Gallery

Reading Objects 2015 is part of an ongoing, interdisciplinary series featuring works from the permanent collection of The Dorsky Museum. The works on display are accompanied by texts or other responses to the work prepared by SUNY New Paltz faculty and staff. Responses take the form of poetry, prose, fiction and non-fiction, as well as collaborative texts.

 

Deb Lucke, Barking Deer, 2013, Archival inkjet print, courtesy the artist

The Stories We Tell: Hudson Valley Artists 2015

Curated by The Dorsky Museum

June 20 — November 8, 2015
Alice and Horace Chandler Gallery/North Gallery

The Stories We Tell focuses on the narrative form of contemporary art and examines how stories shape our experience and our understanding of the world. Instinctively, we are all storytellers merging fiction with non-fiction and conflating the real with the imagined.

Sean Bayliss | Allen Bryan | Dina Bursztyn | Maureen Cummins | Tasha Depp | Marcia Due | Richard Edelman | Ben Fishman | Kevin Frank | Derek James | Tana Kellner | Virginia Lavado | Deb Lucke | Kathleen MacKenzie | Nestor Madalengoitia | Norman Magnusson | Matthew Maley | Perry Meigs | Phyllis Gay Palmer | Michael Rose | Phil Sigunick | Ken Tannenbaum | Jean Tansey | Jerry Thompson | Karen Whitman | Tona Wilson

This year's edition of the museum's annual juried exhibition of work by Hudson Valley artists will run from June 20 — November 8, 2015 in the Dorsky's Alice and Horace Chandler Gallery and North Gallery. The exhibition is being juried by Mary-Kay Lombino, an award-winning curator of contemporary art and The Emily Hargroves Fisher '57 and Richard B. Fisher Curator and Assistant Director for Strategic Planning of the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center at Vassar College.

 

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