American Scenery 
Different Views in Hudson River School Painting         SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART
 

HOME

INTRODUCTION

VIEW THE EXHIBITION

CHECKLIST

CEDAR GROVE

OLANA

WESTMORELAND
MUSEUM OF
AMERICAN ART

SAMUEL DORSKY
MUSEUM OF ART

Introduction

The Hudson River School, considered by many to be the first truly American school of painting, flourished between 1825 and 1875. The movement was embraced by three generations of artists who shared common principles uniting them as a school despite their individual differences in style. Primary among these was a belief in natural religion, a deep admiration for the magnificence of nature, and a keen interest in the direct observation of nature. Most importantly, however, was awareness of the fresh, untamed American scenery as reflective of the optimism and independence of our character as a young nation.

This exhibition from a remarkable private collection groups paintings by Hudson River School artists in pairs and series either intended as such by the artists or around recurrent themes of great significance to the movement. The underlying purpose of these groupings is to enable the contemporary viewer to understand more readily the artist’s objectives by actively engaging in these comparisons and contrasts.

The exhibition was organized and toured by the Westmoreland Museum of American Art, Greensburg, Pennsylvania, Judith O'Toole, curator.

Generous support for this exhibition provided by Friends of the Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, The Dorsky Foundation, James H. and Mary Ottaway, Morgan Anderson Consulting, Hudson United Bank, and KeyBank

STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT NEW PALTZ

Web site design and construction Uhlenbrj@newpaltz.edu