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Department of Linguistics

Faculty

Oksana Laleko
Assistant Professor and Director, Linguistics Program
Office: JFT 706
Phone: (845) 257-2745
E-mail:
lalekoo@newpaltz.edu

Oksana Laleko received a Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Minnesota. Her research interests focus on the interface between syntax and discourse-pragmatics, the encoding of information structure, and the expression of temporality, particularly in bilingual settings. Her recent work examines cross-linguistic parallels in heritage language acquisition and language loss.
She teaches Syntax, Bilingualism and Language Contact, Etymology and Morphology, Development of Modern English, and Introduction to Linguistics for the Linguistics Program.
 
Corbin Neuhauser
Adjunct Faculty, Linguistics Program
Office: JFT 416
E-mail: cneuhauser@gc.cuny.edu
Corbinian Neuhauser received his Bachelor's in Linguistics at SUNY New Paltz in 2009 and is currently working on his PhD from the CUNY Graduate Center. His research interests are theoretical syntax in the Distributional Morphology framework and the modeling of syntactic changes over time. His recent work has been on the interaction between negation and perfective marking in Mandarin. Languages of interest include modern Mandarin, Classical Chinese, Japanese, and West Germanic languages.
He teaches Semantics, Etymology and Morphology, Syntax, and Introduction to Linguistics for the Linguistics Program.
 
Aiko Pletch
Adjunct Faculty, Linguistics Program
Office: JFT 416
Email: pletcha1@newpaltz.edu
 
Aiko Pletch received her MA in Applied Linguistics from Concordia University in Montreal, Canada. She has worked as an English as a Second Language teacher in Japan, Canada and the US and to students from all over the world. Her interests are second language acquisition and sociolinguistics. She has studied French, Spanish, and Japanese.
She teaches Introduction to Linguistics for the Linguistics Program.

David Appelbaum
Professor, Department of Philosophy
Office: JFT 1005
Phone: (845) 257-2983
E-mail: appelbad@newpaltz.edu

David Appelbaum received a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Harvard University.  At SUNY New Paltz he teaches Ethics, Comparative (East/West) Philosophy, Modern Philosophy, and Theory of Knowledge.  He is the author of two books on Jacque Derrida. His most recent book is Jacques Derrida's Ghost: A Conjuration (SUNY Press, 2008).   He also writes and publishes poetry.
He teaches Philosophy of Language for the Linguistics Program.

Victor de Munck
Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology
Office: WSB 228
Phone: (845) 257-2985
E-mail: demunckv@newpaltz.edu

Victor de Munck received a Ph.D. from the University of California Riverside.  After teaching at the University of New Hampshire, he joined the faculty at SUNY New Paltz in 1997.  His courses include Research Methods, Cultures of India, Cultural Anthropology, Political Anthropology, and Cognitive Anthropology.  From January through May, 2009, he taught cultural anthropology and anthropological data collection methods and analysis at St. Cyril Methodius University in Skopje, Macedonia on a Fulbright grant.  Previously, Dr. deMunck received a Fulbright grant and lectured in Lithuania.           
He teaches Cognitive Anthropology for the Linguistics Program.

Elizabeth Hester, Department of Communication Disorders
Assistant Professor
Office:  HUM B4B
Phone: (845) 257-3465
E-mail: hestere@newpaltz.edu 

Elizabeth Hester is Coordinator of Graduate Programs in Communications Disorders. Her primary areas of academic interest are phonology and child language.  She received her Master’s Degree from California State University, Fresno, where she subsequently conducted clinic at Valley Children’s Hospital in both patient and outpatient settings.  She received her doctoral degree from Wichita State University, where she carried out recently published research with Barbara Hodson on phonological production, working memory, and reading decoding.  Her research interests include the study of suprasegmental basis of speech and reading, the evolution of language and speech perception and the precursors of phonological awareness.  She currently teaches phonetics, phonology and child language at SUNY New Paltz and enjoys hiking and skiing in the mountains nearby.
She teaches Phonetics and Child Language Acquisition for the Linguistics Program

Stephanie Kakadelis
Adjunct Faculty, Linguistics Program
Office: JFT 416
Phone: (845) 257-2760

E-mail: kakadels@newpaltz.edu

Stephanie Kakadelis received her MA in Linguistics from The University of Hawai'i Manoa. She is currently working on her PhD from the CUNY Graduate Center. Her interests are in sentence processing and especially how prosodic and intonation information shapes the processing of language. Languages she has studied include Modern Greek, Japanese, Indonesian, Eguptian Arabic, French, and Spanish.
She teachers Introduction to Linguistics and Semantics for the Linguistics Program.

Richard Kelder, Co-Director, Center for Teaching and Learning
Adjunct Faculty
Office: HUM 111
Phone: (845) 257-3589
E-mail: kelderr@newpaltz.edu

Richard Kelder is the Associate Director for the Center for Academic Development and Learning, and Co-Director for the Center for Teaching and Learning at SUNY New Paltz.  He has an MA in English and has done post-graduate study at New York University and the University at Albany where he is currently completing a Ph.D. in educational theory.  His research interests are in language and identity.
He teaches Sociolinguistics for the Linguistics Program.

Daniel Kempton, Department of English
Associate Professor/Graduate Director
Office: JFT 818
Phone: (845) 257-2728
E-mail: kemptond@newpaltz.edu

Daniel Kempton received a doctorate in literature from the University of California, Santa Cruz in 1977.  His primary areas of teaching and research are medieval literature and literary theory and his avocation is opera.  He has published on Chaucer, Christine de Pizan, Edgar Allan Pie and Benjamin Britton.
He teaches Introduction to Old English and the Development of Modern English for the Linguistics Program.