Seminars

Fall 2015 Seminars

HON 201 The Individual and Society
Instructors: James Schiffer (English), Rachel Somerstein (Digital Media & Journalism), Patricia A. Sullivan (Digital Media & Journalism, Honors) & Vicki Tromanhauser (English)
GE Requirement:  Humanities (HUM)

Investigates the relationship between the individual and society through discussion of the philosophic, literary, and historical aspects of major texts.

HON 202 Work
Instructor: Susan Books (Secondary Education)
GE Requirement: Diversity (DIVR)

Learning to do a job is one thing; learning to appropriate and affirm meaningful work for oneself is another.  A focus on  the broad concept of work invites consideration of a range of conceptual and policy-related questions.

HON 375 Doing Race and Gender
Instructor: Anne Roschelle (Sociology)
GE Requirement: Diversity (DIVR)

Using feminist and racial-ethnic theories we will analyze how gender, race, and class oppression shape the experiences of women and how we, as agents of social change, can translate these theoretical insights into methodological strategies.

HON393 What is Mental Illness?
Instructor: Greta Winograd (Psychology)

In this course, we will learn about mental illness as defined by a range of academic disciplines (e.g., biology, psychology, sociology, anthropology, history, and psychiatric epidemiology), as portrayed in the media, and as understood by the general public.  First person accounts that describe how individuals who have been psychiatrically labeled experience mental illness themselves will provide an equally important perspective.  Throughout the course, we will explore how different mental illness definitions impact diagnostic and treatment options, social responses such as stigma, and the recovery process.

HON 399 Thesis/Project Preparation

Instructor:  Patricia Sullivan (Digital Media & Journalism, Honors)

This course provides support for Honors students who are preparing their thesis or project. Students will refine a research or project topic; develop a thesis statement; identify and evaluate sources; construct an annotated bibliography; receive feedback from peers; and employ communication strategies for working with faculty mentors. 

 

Honors Seminar Picture

Spring 2015 Seminars

HON 203 What Causes Cancer?
Instructor:  Jennifer Waldo (Biology)
GE Requirement: NSCI (Natural Sciences)

There is no simple answer to the question of what causes cancer.  That's primarily because cancer is not a single thing - it manifests differently in different people.  Students will learn basic concepts about the development and treatment of cancer and develop the quantitative skills necessary to evaluate popularly held beliefs and media reports about the causation of cancer.

HON 303 Education and Poverty
Instructor: Susan Books (Secondary Education)
GE Requirement: Diversity (DIVR)

This course offers an interdisciplinary exploration of poverty - its causes, consequences, representation in public discourse, and complicated relationship to schooling.

HON 393 The Materials of History, Thought and Art
Instructor: Cyrus Mulready (English)

How do the objects in our lives shape our identities and our ways of thinking about the world? How do the things that surround us preserve a record of our history? Do objects make thought, discovery, and creativity possible? Our work will lead us to examine our own processes of learning, writing, and thinking with the hope that a more conscious attention to how the objects of our lives affect us will make us better students and scholars.

HON 393 Television and Social Issues
Instructors: Lynn Spangler (Digital Media & Journalism) & La Tasha Brown (Black Studies)

This course will use media to explore social issues and enhance student skills in doing close readings of media texts. Spring semester will explore The Wire and Scandal as springboards for discussing: the creation of television series - intention and realism; critical responses - critics and viewers; close readings and critical approaches - semiotics, narrative, rhetorical, cultural; race, class, gender on television and in reality; war on drugs and criminal justice; unions and work; politics; education; and the media - process and effect. Students will choose their own television series to explore social issues of their choice.

HON 393 Deep History
Instructor: Michael Vargas (History)

Consider three increasingly important questions to interdisciplinary historians: Can "pre-history" (before written records) inform historians about their own explorations of written and other sources? How do historical methods and interpretations change over time? What can historians learn from the methods employed in other learning disciplines? Course themes includes Beyond: religion and faith, artistic impulse, drug highs; Body: tattoos, material culture, fashion; Energy: food, ecosystems and environment; Migration and mobility; Cognition, symbol, and language; Violence - sacred and profane. Our project-based coursework will explore new digital methods for data collection, visualization, and presentation.

HON 399 Thesis/Project Preparation
Instructor:  Patricia A. Sullivan (Digital Media & Journalism, Honors)

This course provides support for Honors students who are preparing their thesis or project. Students will refine a research or project topic; develop a thesis statement; identify and evaluate sources; construct an annotated bibliography; receive feedback from peers; and employ communication strategies for working with faculty mentors.

 


Honors Student Mosaic Series: The Seminar Classes from
SUNY NP Honors Program on Vimeo.