RESOURCES

 

 

Spring 2016 Seminars

HON 202 Work
Instructor: Sue Books (Secondary Education)
GE Requirement: Diversity (DIVR)

Learning to do a job is one thing; learning to appropriate and affirm meaningful work for oneself is another. A focus on the broad concept of work invites consideration of a range of conceptual and policy-related questions.

HON 316 Debates in U.S. History
Instructor: Patricia A. Sullivan (Digital Media & Journalism, Honors)
GE Requirement: United States Studies (USST)

An exploration of selected and pivotal topics in the history of the United States from the colonial period through today. Politics, economics, society, and culture will be examined focusing on primary source documents and images.

HON 393 Jamaica: History, Culture, and Its People
Instructor: La Tasha Brown (Digital Media & Journalism)

This is an interdisciplinary undergraduate course, which seeks to provide students with an introduction into Jamaica's socio-political history. This course will examine a selection of materials drawn from literary texts, films and music, alongside historical and sociological accounts, in an effort to comprehend the socio-political energies and tension underpinning the construction of the Jamaican identity and experience from the 1960s through to the present. The course is organized thematically but it proceeds in chronological order to focus on the major socio-political, economic and cultural period of change in the Jamaican society and the wider Caribbean region. The larger conceptualized issues which this course will address include different forms of colonialism and the ways in which contemporary identities have responded to such historical constructs. It will be particularly concerned with examining the complex web of relationships between creativity and cultural production and showing how literature and music for example can provide alternative perspectives on matters such as history, race, culture and national identity.

HON 393 Free Speech in America
Instructor: Robert Miraldi (Communication)

For citizens, journalists and democracy, the First Amendment to the Constitution guarantees freedom of speech and press, insuring that information will be available. And yet, there are limits to the kinds of speech that is allowed, even in a free society. This course will explore those limits while explaining the role information plays in a democracy, analyzing how America regulates speech, and underscoring the controversy that surrounds most free speech questions. It will also tie many free speech questions to larger issues in American culture. Thus, the course has elements of media studies, law, journalism, political science, history and sociology.

HON 393 The Literature of Witness
Instructors: Jan Schmidt (English) & Heather Hewett (English, Women's Gender & Sexuality Studies)

This course will examine how artists treat human rights and social justice issues, trauma and atrocity, as well as protest, genocide, and violence occurring in a Holocaust, and post-Holocaust, global world.

 

HON 399 Thesis/Project Preparation
Instructor: Patricia A. Sullivan (Digital Media & Journalism, Honors)

This course provides support for Honors students who are preparing their thesis or project. Students will refine a research or project topic; develop a thesis statement; identify and evaluate sources; construct an annotated bibliography; receive feedback from peers; and employ communication strategies for working with faculty mentors.

 

 

Fall 2015 Seminars

HON 201 The Individual and Society
Instructors: James Schiffer (English), Rachel Somerstein (Digital Media & Journalism), Patricia A. Sullivan (Digital Media & Journalism, Honors) & Vicki Tromanhauser (English)
GE Requirement:  Humanities (HUM)

Investigates the relationship between the individual and society through discussion of the philosophic, literary, and historical aspects of major texts.

HON 371 Education Across Borders
Instructor: Susan Books (Secondary Education)
GE Requirement: World (WRLD)

Exploration of the culture and history of selected non-Western countries - initially, China, South Africa, Afghanistan - and of how the cultural/historical context affects schooling in these countries, past and present.

HON 375 Doing Race and Gender
Instructor: Anne Roschelle (Sociology)
GE Requirement: Diversity (DIVR)

Using feminist and racial-ethnic theories we will analyze how gender, race, and class oppression shape the experiences of women and how we, as agents of social change, can translate these theoretical insights into methodological strategies.

HON393 What is Mental Illness?
Instructor: Greta Winograd (Psychology)

In this course, we will learn about mental illness as defined by a range of academic disciplines (e.g., biology, psychology, sociology, anthropology, history, and psychiatric epidemiology), as portrayed in the media, and as understood by the general public.  First person accounts that describe how individuals who have been psychiatrically labeled experience mental illness themselves will provide an equally important perspective.  Throughout the course, we will explore how different mental illness definitions impact diagnostic and treatment options, social responses such as stigma, and the recovery process.

HON 399 Thesis/Project Preparation

Instructor:  Patricia Sullivan (Digital Media & Journalism, Honors)

This course provides support for Honors students who are preparing their thesis or project. Students will refine a research or project topic; develop a thesis statement; identify and evaluate sources; construct an annotated bibliography; receive feedback from peers; and employ communication strategies for working with faculty mentors.