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Spring 2017 Seminars 

HON 201 The Individual and Society
Instructor: Patricia A. Sullivan (Digital Media & Journalism, Honors)
GE Requirement:  Humanities (HUM)

Investigates the relationship between the individual and society through discussion of the philosophic, literary, and historical aspects of major texts.

HON 203 What Causes Cancer?
Instructor: Jennifer Waldo (Biology)
GE Requirement: Natural Sciences (NSCI)

There is no simple answer to the question of what causes cancer. Cancer is not a single thing; it manifests itself differently in each individual. After an introduction to the basic science necessary for understanding the development of cancer, a series of popularly held beliefs regarding cancer causation will be critically analyzed. With these examples as a foundation, students will research and report on a topic on their own choice.

HON 371 Education Across Borders
Instructor: Susan Books (Teaching and Learning)
GE Requirement: World (WRLD)

Exploration of the culture and history of selected non-Western countries - initially, China, South Africa, and Afghanistan - and of how the cultural/historical context affects schooling in these countries, past and present.

HON 393 Love and Heartbreak
Instructor: Lisa Phillips (Digital Media and Journalism)

This interdisciplinary honors seminar will explore love and heartbreak through the lens of literature/literary theory, philosophy, psychology, pop culture, and gender studies. Potential authors/thinkers/artists: Roland Barthes, Bell Hooks, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Stendhal, Mary Wollstonecraft, Sophie Calle, Christina Nehring, Dorothy Tennov, Helen Fisher, Laura Kipnis, James Baldwin, Maggie Nelson.

HON 393 The Materials of History, Thought and Art
Instructor:  Cyrus Mulready (English)

How do the objects in our lives shape our identities and our ways of thinking about the world? How do the things that surround us preserve a record of our history? Do objects make thought, discovery, and creativity possible? Our work will lead us to examine our own processes of learning, writing, and thinking with the hope that a more conscious attention to how the objects of our lives affect us will make us better students and scholars.

HON 393 U.S. Women Win the Vote
Instructor:  Susan Lewis (History)

This course explores how women won the vote in the United States, beginning with the birth of the women's rights movement in the Enlightenment and Age of Revolution, moving to the first public demands for the vote in the 1840s, and following the women's rights movement up to 1920. We will focus particularly on the suffrage and anti-suffrage movements of the Progressive Era in New York State, asking: (1) why did women win the vote in this period, not earlier or later, (2) what forces obstructed women's full political rights and citizenship, and (3) which individuals and groups, and which strategies, were most responsible for the suffrage victories in New York (1917) and nationally (1920)? Students will conduct research projects on individual suffragists and contribute to a nation-wide database.

HON 399 Thesis/Project Preparation
Instructor:  Patricia Sullivan (Digital Media & Journalism, Honors)

This course provides support for Honors students who are preparing their thesis or project. Students will refine a research or project topic; develop a thesis statement; identify and evaluate sources; construct an annotated bibliography; receive feedback from peers; and employ communication strategies for working with faculty mentors. 

 

Fall 2016 Seminars

HON 201 The Individual and Society
Instructors: James Schiffer (English), Patricia A. Sullivan (Digital Media & Journalism, Honors), Vicki Tromanhauser (English) & Hamilton Stapell (History)
GE Requirement:  Humanities (HUM)

Investigates the relationship between the individual and society through discussion of the philosophic, literary, and historical aspects of major texts.

HON 303 Education and Poverty 
Instructor: Susan Books (Secondary Education)
GE Requirement: World (WRLD)

This course offers an interdisciplinary exploration of poverty -- its causes, consequences, representation in public discourse, and complicated relationship to schooling.

HON 375 Doing Race and Gender
Instructor: Anne Roschelle (Sociology)
GE Requirement: Diversity (DIVR)

Using feminist and racial-ethnic theories we will analyze how gender, race, and class oppression shape the experiences of women and how we, as agents of social change, can translate these theoretical insights into methodological strategies.

HON 372 U.S. Drug Education and Policy
Instructor: Katherine McCoy  (Educational Studies)
GE Requirement:  United States Studies (USST)

Explores historical, psychological, sociological, legal, and moral perspectives on drug education and policy in the U.S. Develops critical, international, and comparative perspectives on racial, gendered, class-based, and ethnic inequalities in drug policy and enforcement.

HON 399 Thesis/Project Preparation

Instructor:  Patricia Sullivan (Digital Media & Journalism, Honors)

This course provides support for Honors students who are preparing their thesis or project. Students will refine a research or project topic; develop a thesis statement; identify and evaluate sources; construct an annotated bibliography; receive feedback from peers; and employ communication strategies for working with faculty mentors.